Архив за год 3 августа, 2020

New Bioplastic Material for Bags

BGUSA, INC announced today that they have solved the much-disputed argument of ridding the Earth of single-use plastic bags. All-natural food waste ingredients and organic starches are the derivatives of these bags. No added chemicals altar the composition of these bags.

Covestro Launches Bio Polycarbonate Film

Now more than ever before, OEMs and designers are looking for sustainable alternatives to the traditional materials used in their applications. Recognizing that sustainable thinking and action are key to a brighter future, we’re expanding our materials portfolio with a novel polycarbonate film.

Sustainable innovation: the benefits of partly bio-based Makrofol® EC

As part of our long-term commitment to the circular economy, we’re bringing sustainability and innovation together with the launch of our first partly bio-based polycarbonate film: Makrofol® EC.

More than 50% of this material’s carbon content is sourced from plant-based biomass.

When compared to standard films made from petrochemicals, a portion of the oil-based primary products used have been replaced with plant-based raw materials.

First Plastic to Kill Corona Virus

symphony environmental

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reducing the use of raw materials based on fossil resources slashes the film’s carbon footprint by approximately 20%.

With Makrofol® EC polycarbonate film,  our customers can benefit from a more sustainable alternative to standard polycarbonate films that exhibits comparable or even better properties, including improved chemical and weather resistance.

This partly bio-based film also offers excellent mechanical properties and impact strength, high abrasion resistance and surface hardness, and good optical properties.


Banana Republic, Why Turn Plastic into CO2 and Plastic Waste from Ships


 

Makrofol® EC polycarbonate films can be processed by a variety of technologies, including printing, thermoforming, high-pressure forming (HPF), coating (hardcoat, adhesive), cutting and lamination.

Polycarbonate film in action

Similar to conventional polycarbonate films, Makrofol® EC polycarbonate film can be used a variety of applications spanning several industries, including:

  • Automotive: Speedometers, decorative trim parts and instrument clusters
  • Electrical, electronics & appliances: Electrical insulation, electronic housing and decorative control panels
  • Graphics: Labels, tags, overlays and signage
  • Packaging: Thermoformed packaging for sensitive goods

More and more customers are supporting sustainable products. This is why research on bio-based products is an important priority for us.

Wieland Hovestadt Head of Research and Development in the Specialty Films division, Covestro

Key benefits

  • High strength Features excellent mechanical properties and impact strength
  • Excellent weather and chemical resistance Offers improved resistance to UV rays and chemicals
  • High durability Provides high abrasion resistance and surface hardness

Procter and Gamble Goes Carbon Neutral

Reducing GHG Emissions by 50% and Purchasing 100% Renewable Electricity for all Manufacturing Sites by 2030 and Advancing Natural Climate Solutions that Deliver a Carbon Benefit Equal to Remaining GHG Emissions from Operations.

The Procter & Gamble Company announced a new commitment to have its global operations be carbon neutral for the decade through a series of interventions that protect, improve and restore nature.

Recognizing the next decade represents a critical window for the world to accelerate progress on climate change, P&G will go beyond its existing Science Based Target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by additionally advancing a portfolio of natural climate solutions.

These efforts will deliver a carbon benefit that balances any remaining emissions over the next 10 years, allowing P&G operations to be carbon neutral for the decade.

Based on current estimates, the Company will need to balance ~30 million metric tons of carbon from 2020 to 2030.

P&G’s priority continues to be reducing emissions. P&G has an existing goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50% and purchasing 100% renewable electricity by 2030 and is on track to deliver on its 2030 commitments.

In addition, P&G will continue pursuing new wind, solar and geothermal projects to further accelerate the transition to renewables.

These efforts are aligned with what climate science says is needed to help ensure the Company does its part to limit global temperature increase and will continue well beyond 2030.

However, based on today’s technologies, there are some emissions that cannot be eliminated by 2030. By investing in natural climate solutions, the Company will accelerate its impact over the next 10 years.

A Critical Window

Recent reports have highlighted that the world is falling short of the greenhouse gas emission reductions needed and that the next decade represents a critical window to reduce emissions and be on a path to limiting temperature increase to 1.5°C.

That task will get much harder if society doesn’t start curbing emissions before the decade ends. By 2050, carbon emissions must fall to zero, or close to it.

​Failure to act now will put future generations at greater risk from climate change impacts and make achieving the global targets of the Paris Accord more difficult.

“Climate change is happening, and action is needed now,” said David Taylor, P&G Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer. “By reducing our carbon footprint and investing in natural climate solutions, we will be carbon neutral for the decade across our operations and help protect vulnerable ecosystems and communities around the world.”

Natural Climate Solutions: “Nature alone can solve up to one-third of climate change”

P&G will partner with Conservation International and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to identify and fund a range of projects designed to protect, improve and restore critical ecosystems like forests, wetlands, grasslands and peatlands.

In addition to sequestering more carbon, an important aspect of natural climate solutions is the potential to deliver meaningful environmental and socioeconomic co-benefits that serve to protect and enhance nature and improve the livelihoods of local communities.

As P&G moves forward, the company will seek to identify, measure and communicate relevant co-benefits from its investment in nature.

P&G is developing a detailed project portfolio and investing in projects across the globe. Projects already identified include:

  • Philippines Palawan Protection Project with Conservation International – To protect, improve and restore Palawan’s mangroves and critical ecosystems. Palawan is the world’s fourth most “irreplaceable” area for unique and threatened wildlife.
  • Atlantic Forest Restoration Planning with WWF – In the Atlantic Forest on Brazil’s east coast, laying the groundwork for forest landscape restoration with meaningful impacts on biodiversity, water, food security and other co-benefits for local communities.
  • Evergreen Alliance with Arbor Day Foundation – Bringing corporations, communities and citizens together to take critical action to preserve the necessities of life affected by climate change—including planting trees to restore areas devastated by wildfires in Northern California and enhance forests in Germany.

“Nature must be a key part of any strategy to combat the climate crisis,” said Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International. “Research shows that we cannot meet our climate goals unless we protect, restore and improve the management of carbon-rich ecosystems. Done right, these efforts can deliver a third of the emissions reductions needed within the next decade, and importantly, support the livelihoods of communities on the front lines of climate change. We’re delighted to be working with Procter & Gamble to protect nature – an investment that is a win for people and our planet.”

“We’ve worked with P&G to drive climate progress and safeguard forests for over a decade, because the scope of their business means they can deliver results at a scale that matters,” said Carter Roberts, U.S. President and CEO of WWF. “Importantly, that progress hasn’t been limited to their own corporate footprint. P&G was an early partner in the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance, which has helped expand corporate renewable energy procurements across the United States. Today’s announcement marks further progress by putting a greater focus on the role that preserving nature can play – not just in absorbing carbon emissions, but in providing the services and resources that sustain life on earth. We look forward to working with P&G to achieve these new commitments over the next decade.”

P&G Brands take the lead on carbon footprint reduction and climate positive habit changes

Committing to going beyond its Science Based Target for reducing operational emissions is important, but the Company will not stop there.

For more than two decades, P&G has been committed to harnessing the scientific rigor of the Life Cycle Assessment of its products to better understand the emissions from its supply chain and consumer use of its products (Scope 3 emissions).

Up to 85% of P&G’s Scope 3 emissions are from consumer use of its products. P&G reaches five billion people through its brands, and with this scale comes a responsibility to give consumers the power to reduce their own carbon footprints with products that are designed to help save energy, water and natural resources.

  • More than 60% of a laundry detergent’s footprint is in the consumer use phase, mostly related to the energy used to heat the water. Ariel and Tide have been optimizing detergent formulas for high efficiency in low temperature washing and inspiring positive “Turn to 30” and “Cold Water Wash” laundry behaviors. The goal is to have 70% of machine loads be low-energy cycle loads, and major progress has been achieved by educating consumers in the U.S. over the last ten years on the benefits of low-energy wash cycles. P&G estimates that since 2015, the avoided emissions from consumers increasing their use of low-energy laundry cycles have been roughly 15 million metric tons of CO2, which is equivalent to taking three million cars off the road.
  • Busting a popular myth, Cascade is showing consumers how the dishwasher is designed to be more water and energy efficient than washing in the sink. Cascade and Fairy Automatic Dish Washing Tablets allow consumers to skip pre-wash and save water and the energy needed to heat the water. Fairy and Dawn Dish Washing Liquid’s grease cutting power enables water and energy savings: by reducing the water temperature 20°C (36°F), consumers can save up to 50% CO2 of the total footprint every wash.

“Our role as leaders is to make a lower emission economy and lifestyle possible, affordable and desirable for everyone,” said Virginie Helias, P&G’s Chief Sustainability Officer. “It is our responsibility to protect critical carbon reserves and invest in solutions that regenerate our planet. Consumers also want to do more to address climate change. As a company, we touch five billion people with our brands; we are striving to make a difference every day by encouraging responsible consumption with products that are effective and intuitive to enable adoption of new lower emission habits.”

Oimo Creates Starch Based Water-Soluble Packaging for Food, Drinks and Cosmetics

Spanish startup Oimo is set to revolutionise the packaging industry with a biodegradable and water-soluble material with the same properties as traditional plastic.

The material is created from algae, natural sugars and vegetable oils and is non- toxic to marine life. Currently, Oimo is focusing on adapting it for the production of disposable packaging in the food sector, beverage canholder’s and cosmetic packaging.

Oimo has received a grant of 75,000 euros from ACCIÓ from the Startup Capital line funded by the Generalitat of Catalunya, The grant is aimed at promising new technology companies.

The startup is now based in Spain but is a spin-off from Brunel University London and was founded in 2019. It has already applied for a patent for this material and will begin marketing it next year.

Friday 10 July 2020 — The Spanish startup Oimo has created a sustainable material similar to plastic from algae extracts, natural sugars and vegetable oils that is non-toxic for marine life. It is a project based on the circular economy that allows the production of a biodegradable material in a marine environment, from natural sources and with the same properties of many types of traditional plastic minus the negative effects on the environment. The company has already applied for a patent for this material, designed to produce disposable packaging for the food sector, canholders for beverage cans and cosmetic packaging.

Oimo is one of the companies that benefited from the Startup Capital grant from ACCIÓ, the agency for company’s competitiveness in the Department of Business and Knowledge.

According to the CEO of Oimo, Albert Marfà, “until recently people did not realize the great impact that plastic generates for our planet, but now all companies are aware of the need to reduce it and the legislation also works in this regard, because every year more than 8 million tons of plastic ends up in the sea ”. “We have developed a type of sustainable packaging that weighs little

and is easy to work with to achieve the necessary flexibility or rigidity according to the needs of the different possible applications,” says Marfà.

For the company’s CEO, “it is more relevant than ever to work from the circular economy, considering the exponential increase in single-use plastics during the health crisis caused by covid-19.” The biomaterial “is biodegradable both on land and in salt or fresh water and is non-toxic to marine life, often a victim of waste that cannot be recycled,” says Marfà.

The emerging company does not manufacture final products, but formulates and designs this new biodegradable raw material that can be adapted to all types of applications and that can be used in the machinery to work the plastic that is currently used. To achieve this material, the company heats the natural molecules present in the algae extracts or vegetable oils to produce a chemical reaction that allows them to obtain a series of molecular chains that adhere to create this bioplastic. Among the uses of the biomaterial developed by Oimo are disposable food containers, canholders for beverage cans or packaging for the cosmetics sector. The startup also offers consulting services to end companies that want to understand how they can adapt the products they used to make with traditional plastic and thus contribute to “promoting sustainable innovation in the packaging sector,” explains Marfà.

Oimo, founded in early 2019 and based in Barcelona, ​​plans to bring the new material to market with clients (manufacturers of plastic products or end customers, for example, in the food or cosmetics industry) in 2021.

The startup currently has a team of four people, a team that includes engineers, chemists, business development experts, as well as external collaborators and consultants.

New Pyrolysis Plant in Virginia

Company to invest $31.7 million to establish first-of-its-kind waste plastics facility and manufacturing operation.

Governor Ralph Northam today announced that Braven Environmental, a leader in deriving fuel from landfill-bound plastic, will invest $31.7 million to establish a manufacturing operation in Cumberland County’s shell building. Virginia successfully competed with North Carolina and South Carolina for the project, which will create 52 new jobs. This is the first economic development announcement for Cumberland County since 2009.

“Braven Environmental will bring well-paid job opportunities to the citizens of Cumberland County while lessening our overall environmental footprint in the years to come,” said Governor Northam. “Providing the business environment and infrastructure to attract operations of this kind to rural Virginia is critical to our efforts to generate economic growth in all corners of the Commonwealth. Our economy is hurting right now, and these new jobs will have a great impact in the region.”

Braven Environmental uses the science of pyrolysis, not incineration, to break down waste plastics with minimal emissions. The output can be used to create new plastics or as fuel produced with much lower carbon emissions than traditional oil or gas production. Braven Environmental’s new plant will stop waste plastics from entering landfills, oceans, and waterways, while also reducing Virginia’s greenhouse gas emissions by ending the impact of long distance transportation used in current waste plastic solutions. Braven Environmental is committed to hiring locally and providing good jobs in the Cumberland County community. The company plans to create a total of over 80 new jobs within 18 months of the first phase of this project.

“Job creation announcements are especially important as we work to repair the economic impacts of COVID-19,” said Secretary of Commerce and Trade Brian Ball. “Braven Environmental’s decision to establish its new fuel manufacturing operation in Cumberland County is an exciting win for the Commonwealth, and it underscores the competitive advantages available to industry-leading companies in the Southside Virginia. We welcome Braven to the Commonwealth, and we look forward to working together to ensure Virginia is proactively reducing its carbon footprint.”

“Braven’s decision to develop its next site in Virginia as part of its planned U.S. expansions was driven by the state’s pro-business and innovation economy, and the fact that Virginia sees an enormous amount of waste that is either transported long distance for processing or ends up in local landfills,” said Nick Canosa, President and CEO of Braven Environmental. “With this facility, we’re looking forward to working hand-in-hand with Cumberland County to address the existing plastic waste issue with proven technology, while bringing long-term jobs to the community.”

The Virginia Economic Development Partnership worked with Cumberland County and Virginia’s Growth Alliance to secure the project for Virginia. Governor Northam approved a $150,000 grant from the Commonwealth’s Opportunity Fund to assist Cumberland County with the project. The Virginia Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission approved $65,000 in Tobacco Region Opportunity Funds for the project, and funding and services to support the company’s employee training activities will be provided through the Virginia Jobs Investment Program.

“Cumberland County’s Board of Supervisors is proud to welcome Braven Environmental to the County,” said Chairman of the Cumberland County Board of Supervisors Brian Stanley. “Through the diligent work of our Economic Development Authority, opportunity and prosperity has been delivered.”

“Braven’s investment and development of technology to transform a global problem into a clean fuel solution is revolutionary,” said Chairman of the Cumberland County Economic Development Authority Fred Shumaker. “This type of forward thinking not only reduces the use of traditional fuels, therefore lowering the state’s carbon footprint, but also reduces the volume of waste in the environment. This is a great win for Virginia and her environment, but specifically for Cumberland County.”

“Braven Environmental’s investment is a gamechanger for Cumberland County and these new jobs will change lives in Southside Virginia,” said Congressman Denver Riggleman. “I am very excited about this announcement and the potential of the project. Braven brings an innovative technology project that will increase prosperity in Cumberland and reduce carbon emissions in Virginia.”

“This reaffirms that Virginia’s current policies toward business and growth are attractive to commercial interests,” said Senator Mark Peake. “Beyond the much-needed jobs that Braven Environmental will provide, the total impact on Cumberland is almost unimaginable. I am very excited about how this project will bolster local government, generate growth in area businesses, and offer new educational opportunities in Cumberland County Public Schools. I welcome Braven Environmental and offer my support in my capacity in the Senate of Virginia.”

“We are always looking for innovative businesses to join our community here in Cumberland County and Southern Virginia, and Braven Environmental is exactly that,” said Delegate Thomas Wright. “I am pleased that Virginia was able to successfully compete against other states for this project, and I believe that our strong business climate and more-than-capable workforce will play a strong role in the success of this new venture.”

Americans Start Ocean Clean Up

Ocean Voyages Institute’s marine plastic recovery vessel, S/V KWAI, docked at the port of Honolulu today, after a 48-day expedition, successfully removing 103 tons (206,000 lbs.) of fishing nets and consumer plastics from the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone, more commonly known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch or Gyre.

Establishing its lead in open ocean clean-up, Ocean Voyages Institute has set a new record with the largest at sea clean-up in the Gyre to date, more than doubling its own results from last year.

“I am so proud of our hard working crew,” says Mary Crowley, founder and executive director of Ocean Voyages Institute. “We exceeded our goal of capturing 100 tons of toxic consumer plastics and derelict ‘ghost’ nets, and in these challenging times, we are continuing to help restore the health of our ocean, which influences our own health and the health of the planet.”

Crowley adds: “The oceans can’t wait for these nets and debris to break down into microplastics which impair the ocean’s ability to store carbon and toxify the fragile ocean food web.”

Known as the “Ghost Net Buster,” Crowley is renowned for developing effective methods to remove significant amounts of plastics out of the ocean, including 48 tons (96,000 lbs.) of toxic plastics during two ocean clean-ups in 2019, one from the Gyre and one from the waters surrounding the Hawaiian islands.

“There is no cure-all solution to ocean clean-up: It is the long days at sea, with dedicated crew scanning the horizon, grappling nets, and retrieving huge amounts of trash, that makes it happen,” says Locky MacLean, a former director at Sea Shepherd and ocean campaigner in marine conservation for two decades.

The GPS satellite trackers used by Ocean Voyages Institute since 2018 are proving Crowley’s theory that one tracker can lead to many nets. The ocean frequently sorts debris so that a tagged fishing net can lead to other nets and a density of debris within a 15 mile radius.


The Pacific Gyre, located halfway between Hawaii and California, is the largest area with the most plastic, of the five major open ocean plastic accumulation regions, or Gyres, in the world’s oceans.

“We are utilizing proven nautical equipment to effectively clean-up the oceans while innovating with new technologies,” says Crowley. “Ocean Voyages Institute has been a leader in researching and accomplishing ocean clean-up for over a decade, granted with less fanfare and attention than others, but with passion and commitment and making meaningful impacts.”

Ocean Voyages Institute will be unloading the record-breaking haul of ocean plastic debris while docked alongside Pier 29 thanks to the support of Honolulu-based Matson, in preparation for upcycling and proper disposal.

“In keeping with our commitment to environmental stewardship, Matson has been searching for a way to get involved in cleaning up the Pacific Gyre,” said Matt Cox, chairman and CEO. “We’ve been impressed with the groundbreaking efforts of Ocean Voyages Institute and the progress they’ve made with such a small organization, and we hope our support will help them continue this important work.”

An Expanded 2020 Expedition

When the sailing cargo ship, S/V KWAI, arrived in Honolulu today, it completed a 48-day at sea clean-up mission that began at the Hawaiian port of Hilo on May 4, after a three week self- imposed quarantine period to ensure the health of crew members and safety of the mission, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

During the expedition, the KWAI’s multinational crew collected marine plastic pollution with the help of GPS satellite trackers that Ocean Voyages Institute designed with engineer Andy Sybrandy, of Pacific Gyre, Inc. These beacons are placed on nets by volunteer yachts and ships. Drones, as well as lookouts up the mast, enable the ship’s crew to hone in on the debris. They then recover the litter, place it in industrial bags, and store it in the ship’s cargo hold for proper recycling and repurposing at the end of the voyage.

S/V KWAI, led by Captain Brad Ives, and Ocean Voyages Institute are planning a second voyage to the Gyre departing the end of June to continue clean-up of this area, which is so besieged by toxic debris. The length of a second summer leg will be determined by how successful Ocean Voyages Institute is in securing additional donations.

“Our solutions are scalable, and next year, we could have three vessels operating in the North Pacific Gyre for three months all bringing in large cargos of debris,” says Crowley. “We are aiming to expand to other parts of the world desperately needing efficient clean-up technologies.”

Crowley adds: “There is no doubt in my mind that our work is making the oceans healthier for the planet and safer for marine wildlife, as these nets will never again entangle or harm a whale, dolphin, turtle or reefs.”

Who is Kaneka?

Who is Kaneka and Kaneka Biopolymers? The complete history and all you need to know about Kaneka including their circular economy and bioplastics portfolio.

In Short

Kaneka is a Japanese chemical company with a wide range of business activities such as chemicals, functional plastics, expandable plastics & products, foodstuffs products, life-science products, electronic products and synthetic fibers.

History

  • 1949 – Kaneka is created in Osaka as a spin off from the Kanegafuchi Spinning Company.
  • 1950 – Mass production of PVC (Kanevinyl).
  • 1953 – Large scale production of margarine.
  • 1965 – Production of expandable polystyrene (Kanepearl).
  • 1968 – Europe office and New York office. Production of chlorinated PVC.
  • 1970 – Production of extruded polystyrene foam board (Kanelite Foam).
  • 1973 – Production of polyethylene foam.
  • 1985 – Production of polypropylene foam.
  • 2011 – Production of bio-based polymer with soft and heat-resistant properties.
  • 2017 – Granted a certificate of biodegradability in marine environment for biodegradable plastics.

Kaneka Biopolymers

Kaneka Biopolymers is a division of Kaneka Corporation and was created out of the need to provide an alternative solution to single-use plastics. The Kaneka Biopolymers brand is Kaneka PHBH™. It’s a plant-based biopolymer.

Kaneka PHBH

Kaneka PHBH are biopolymers in the family of PHAs or Polyhydroxyalkanoates.

Kaneka PHBH grades are polyesters produced by microorganisms. Kaneka PHBH grades are produced via the fermentation of plants. Kaneka’s PHBH is made from plant oil and fat, and other ingredients. Kaneka uses Cupriavidus necator bacteria to produce their PHBH.

Kaneka PHBH combines 2 monomers together: 3-Hydroxyhexanoate with 3-Hydroxybutyrate to make different types of PHBH.

kaneka phbh

The concentration of each monomer during the polymerization process will create a different type of copolymer that can lead to different types of applications. This technique allows the creation of multiple PHBH grades that will mimic a wide variety of plastic shapes.

Kaneka PHBH is marine biodegradable, soil biodegradable and compostable.

Kaneka PHBH has superior advantages compared with other biopolymers.

biodegradability of kaneka PHBH
Biodegradability of PHBH™ 60m film in soil @ 30°c

kaneka biopolymers

Kaneka PHBH production

Kaneka started producing PHBH at their Takasago headquarters in Japan in 2011. The production capacity was 1.000 metric tonnes per year.

They scaled up their Takasago plant to an annual capacity of 5.000 tonnes / year in December 2019 and they’re considering increasing PHBH production to 20.000 tons in the future.

Read more: Kaneka Builds 5.000 tons PHBH Plant

Kaneka PHBH Applications

PHBH bioplastics is exported to Europe to make bags. PHBH is also used to make agricultural mulch films, straws, cutlery, food containers and packaging materials.

Kaneka and Shiseido are working together to develop cosmetic containers.

In the future, Kaneka may want to explore the production of bottles and containers, auto interiors and electrical equipment.

Kaneka Today

  • 2018 Annual Sales: 5.4 billion USD
  • 2019 Employees: 10,571
  • HQ: Tokyo, Japan

Half Year Bioplastics Ranking 2020

Here’s the Brands and Companies Ranking for the period January to June 2020. There’s a bonus today: we’ve given the absolute numbers, no percentages.

Column “Jan to Jun” represent the number of pages viewed that have been tagged with the company or brand name. Example: your company issues 3 press releases. The first press releases is read 600 times, the second 500 times and the third 400 times in the period January to June 2020; well then the number in the column would be 1500 (addition of 600 + 500 + 400). The numbers were very low due to the corona crisis.

Conclusion

I’m not gonna discuss everything in details; but to make a long story short … with the top 10 you’ve got the deal makers … the champions … the guys who have resisted the storm… the kings of the bioplastics industry.

Bioplastics Ranking Half Year 2020

NAMES Ranking JAN to JUN
NOVAMONT 1 5666
BASF 2 5596
BIO-ON 3 5424
DUPONT 4 4816
AVANTIUM 5 4787
SYMPHONY ENVIRONMENTAL 6 3846
NATUREWORKS 7 3368
BRASKEM 8 3288
DANIMER SCIENTIFIC 9 3096
STORA ENSO 10 2918
NESTE 11 2882
CLARIANT 12 2536
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL 13 2220
METABOLIX 14 1915
ALPLA 15 1846
COVESTRO 16 1789
SULAPAC 17 1719
ARKEMA 18 1698
LYONDELLBASELL 19 1691
CORBION 20 1689
TOTAL CORBION 21 1665
MITSUI CHEMICALS 22 1652
VERSALIS 23 1471
BIOAMBER 24 1283
API 25 1281
MATER-BI 26 1260
CELLOPHANE 27 1212
NODAX 28 1200
I’M GREEN 29 1194
KANEKA 30 1101
SOLVAY 31 1068
GENOMATICA 32 1066
FUTAMURA 33 997
TIPA 34 960
DSM 35 958
SYNVINA 36 924
SK CHEMICALS 37 917
CARGILL 38 915
FLOREON 39 910
VERDEZYNE 40 889
NOVOZYMES 41 888
REVERDIA 42 832
EASTMAN 43 768
MYRIANT 44 743
GC INNOVATION AMERICA 45 710
ARCTIC BIOMATERIALS 46 706
DOWDUPONT 47 680
AVANTIUM RENEWABLE POLYMERS 48 665
YIELD10 BIOSCIENCE 49 639
WOODLY 50 637
BIOME BIOPLASTICS 51 630
LACTIPS 52 621
SULZER 53 619
GOOD NATURED 54 619
TRIFILON 55 559
FKuR 56 548
TAGHLEEF INDUSTRIES 57 528
LANZATECH 58 511
SWEETFOAM 59 492
AVA BIOCHEM 60 489
BIOSPHERE PLASTIC 61 483
ECHO INSTRUMENTS 62 482
ARBOBLEND 63 476
METGEN 64 470
EVONIK 65 462
NATUREFLEX 66 453
TECNARO 67 409
VINMAR 68 408
ECOZEN 69 403
GREEN DOT BIOPLASTICS 70 402
ROQUETTE 71 395
TEIJIN 72 388
CORNWARE 73 381
INNOVIA FILMS 74 380
PLA-NET 75 371
INGEO 76 362
BIOCHEMTEX 77 359
TORAY 78 354
MYKAI 79 334
DURASENSE 80 334
ALGOPACK 81 327
ANELLOTECH 82 295
URTHPACT 83 295
RILSAN 84 267
ARBOFORM 85 261
LUMINY 86 253
TERRAVERDAE 87 244
CARDIA BIOPLASTICS 88 225
MINERV 89 224
DURABIO 90 220
VIRENT 91 211
DEINOVE 92 207
BIOLOGIQ 93 204
ECOFLEX 94 200
NATIVIA 95 195
BEYOND GREEN 96 186
ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND (ADM) 97 183
BIORGANI 98 163
TREVA 99 162
CIMV 100 149
GUALAPACK GROUP 101 148
RENMATIX 102 141
RADICI GROUP 103 135
POLYSORB 104 127
BIO4PACK 105 125
MOBIUS 106 117
METEX 107 108
NAFIGATE 108 75
BIOBATCH 109 74
NUREL 110 72
ARBOFILL 111 64
CELUS-BI 112 55
SOLON 113 53
DOMTAR 114 42
LIGNOBOOST 115 42
CARBIOLICE 116 33
GLYCOSBIO 117 28
ABM COMPOSITE 118 15
BIOMER N/A
BIOTEC N/A
BIO-FLEX N/A
YULEX N/A
TEREOS SYRAL N/A
DO GREEN N/A
TEKNOR APEX N/A
BIOSUCCINIUM N/A
ARNITEL ECO N/A
GLOBAL BIOPOLYMERS N/A
BIOHYBRID N/A
METSO N/A
TERRALOY N/A
RADILON N/A
SUCCINITY N/A
BIO-SA N/A
NUPLASTIQ N/A
BIOPLAST N/A
DYADIC N/A
BIOCHOICE N/A
BIODOGRADABLE N/A
GOGLIO N/A
KINGFA N/A
MHG N/A
POLYONE N/A
PSM N/A
TREEMERA N/A
TRELLIS BIOPLASTICS N/A
ZHEJIANG HISUN BIOMATERIALS N/A
MAISTIC N/A
BIO-PDO N/A
BIOAPPLY N/A
BIOBENT N/A
BIOFORM N/A
BIOFRONT N/A
BIOGEM N/A
BIOGRADE N/A
BIOLITE N/A
BIOPAR N/A
BIOPLASTICS INTERNATIONAL N/A
BIOSTEEL N/A
BRONTIDE N/A
CHENQI N/A
CUPFORMA NATURA N/A
ECOPEXX N/A
ECOSPRAY N/A
EPICEROL N/A
FIBROLON N/A
HOFFMANN NEOPAC N/A
MIREL N/A
NEOPAC N/A
PERSTOP N/A
PLANEXT N/A
PLANTIC ECO PLASTIC N/A
PLANTRO N/A
RADELAST N/A
RODENBURG BIOPOLYMERS N/A
SOLANYL N/A
SPECTALITE N/A
STARCHPAK N/A
TECHNYL N/A
TERRALENE N/A
TERRAPRENE N/A
TETRA REX N/A
TORAYCA N/A
FRX POLYMERS N/A
NOFIA N/A
XINHUARUN N/A
GRABIO N/A

Notes

This ranking is based on website statistics of BioplasticsNews.com for the period 1 January – 30 June 2020.

First Wine Bottle in Paper

Meet the Frugal Bottle – the biggest innovation for wine and spirits since the launch of the glass bottle.

The 75cl Frugal Bottle is made from 94% recycled paperboard with a food-grade liner to hold the wine or spirit. It can be refrigerated and keeps the liquid cooler for longer.

The Frugal Bottle, which is comparable in cost to a labelled glass bottle, is the brainchild of British sustainable packaging firm Frugalpac, which creates and supplies recycled paper-based products with the lowest carbon footprint that are easily recycled again so they don’t need to go to landfill.

The Frugal Bottles are made at Frugalpac’s facility in Ipswich.

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The first wine to go on sale in the Frugal Bottle is from the award-winning Italian vineyard Cantina Goccia. 3Q is an unwooded Sangiovese red with a hint of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon.

There are six reasons why the Frugal Bottle is unique.

It’s lighter. The Frugal Bottle weighs just 83g so it is up to five times lighter than a normal glass bottle, making it easier to carry and lighter to transport.

It’s better for the environment. An independent Life Cycle Analysis by Intertek found the Frugal Bottle, which is made from recycled paperboard with no chemicals, has a carbon footprint up to six times (84%) lower than a glass bottle and more than a third less than a bottle made from 100% recycled plastic.

The Frugal Bottle’s water footprint is also at least four times lower than glass.

It’s easy to recycle again. Simply separate the plastic food-grade liner from the paper bottle and put them in your respective recycling bins. Or you can put the whole bottle in your paper recycling bin and the liner will be easily separated in the paper re-pulping process.

It uses less plastic than a plastic bottle. The Frugal Bottle uses up to 77% less plastic. Only 15g compared to a 64g bottle made from 100% recycled plastic.

It stands out. As the Frugal Bottle is made from recycled paperboard, it allows for 360-degree branding across the bottle. No other wine or spirits bottle looks or feels like it, so it stands out on shelf and table.
It’s better for wine producers.

The Frugal Bottle can be produced in the heart of their bottling facility, offers complete freedom on design and print, is more cost effective to transport while reducing their carbon footprint.

The Cantina Goccia Frugal Bottle will initially be available to buy online from http://www.cantinagoccia.com and in Scotland from Woodwinters Wines & Whiskies retail stores and online.

The Frugal Bottle is also under active consideration by a number of leading UK supermarket chains and hospitality groups keen to promote sustainable packaging and will be available from other retail outlets across the UK, in Denmark, and Holland over the next few weeks.

The Frugal Bottle, which can also be used for sprits such as gin, vodka and rum, has already sparked a huge amount of interest in a drinks industry keen to cut their emissions and appeal to a new audience of consumers interested in sustainability.

For example, Spanish wine producer Torres has launched the International Wineries for Climate Action (IWCA) with members targeting an overall reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of 80% by 2045, with a shorter-term target of 50% by 2030.

Moving to the Frugal Bottle will allow wine producers to cut the carbon footprint of each bottle by up to 84% and reduce emissions from transporting bottles as the Frugal Bottles can be made and filled on site.

According to WRAP, the Waste and Resources Action Programme, the UK imports more than 1.6 billion bottles of wine a year.

Frugalpac also developed the Frugal Cup, the world’s first take-away coffee cup made from 96% recycled paper that has a carbon footprint up to 60% lower than conventional cups when sent to landfill and is easier to recycle again.

Frugalpac Chief Executive Malcolm Waugh said:

“Our mission is to design, develop and supply sustainable packaging. The Frugal Bottle is up to five times lighter than a glass bottle, has a carbon footprint up to six times lower and is easy to recycle again.

“We’ve had fantastic feedback from people who’ve trialled the Frugal Bottle. As well as the superior environmental benefits, it looks and feels like no other bottle you have ever seen.

“We want to deliver great wine and spirits in innovative packaging whilst helping our customers and consumers reduce their impact on the environment.

“The Frugal Bottle offers a major point of difference for the global wine and spirits sector through stand out design and positive sustainable benefits.

“Frugalpac’s business model is to supply Frugal Bottle machines for wine producers or packaging companies to manufacture the bottles on their site, cutting carbon emissions even further. Materials can be purchased locally through existing paperboard printers to give maximum freedom of design and the best commercial offering.”

Cantina Goccia owner Ceri Parke, the Frugal Bottle’s launch customer, said:

“We’re delighted to be making history with the most sustainable wine bottle in the world.

“For us, the Frugal Bottle is about achieving a considerably more sustainable form of packaging for an industry crying out for innovation. It will help us decarbonise the drinks industry.

“When some of our top hotel customers saw samples of our paper wine bottle, there was no hesitation in their minds that this type of bottle would be well received in their dining rooms. The launch of the Frugal Bottle is a big leap in sustainability without compromising wine quality.

“It’s much lighter than glass, easier to transport and friendlier to the planet. Just as important, our wine still tastes as wonderful in a paper bottle as it does in glass.

“We passionately believe this is a real game changer for the wine industry, allowing us to sell and transport our award-winning wines in a much more sustainable way whilst still providing a beautiful bottle.”

Douglas Wood, founder, Woodwinters Wines and Whiskies, the Cantina Goccia Frugal Bottle launch supplier, said:

“Woodwinters’ team and customers are huge fans of the delicious wines of Cantina Goccia. Innovation in sustainability at all stages of wine’s journey from vineyard to glass is something that we believe is hugely important.

“We are, therefore, obviously very excited to support the availability of one of our favourite wines in this new format with all its potentially great positive environmental impact.”

 

BASF Chemical Recycling of Mattresses

The materials from old mattresses are to be recycled in such a way that they can be used for the production of new mattresses.

“The target is to recover the raw materials with a quality comparable to that of non-recycled/virgin raw materials”, says Shankara Keelapandal, Business Management Isocyanates Europe.

 

In doing so, BASF is breaking new ground and responding to the raised expectations regarding sustainability of the foam and mattress industry as well as those of consumers.

It is an important step to possibly re-enter post-consumer waste back into product lifecycles.

BASF’s process breaks down the flexible polyurethane and delivers the initially used polyol.

 

From there BASF can produce new foam with a significantly lower carbon footprint, because fewer fossil resources are used.

“It makes projects of that nature quite attractive because, while mattresses are easy to collect and to sort out, at the end of their lifecycle they currently end up being either incinerated or in a landfill, explains technical project manager Arno Volkmann.

First volumes of the recycled material will be delivered to project partners later this year to develop pilot projects together.

“The project is technically complex, but the potential to reduce waste volumes and save resources makes it all worth it” comments Keelapandal.

With the new process, BASF steps up its efforts to increase sustainability and takes one step further toward a circular economy.

Aiming to decouple economic growth from the use of finite resources, BASF accelerates the adoption of the circular economy principle into its day-to-day operations.

“This is why we develop a solution to closing the loop for soft polyurethane foam with the chemical recycling of mattresses,” adds Keelapandal.